Character Sheet

About Your Character

Name

Enter your character’s name here.

Class

This is your occupation, role type, or area of specialization.

You may choose a class from the database. Classes provide a unique bonus, rule, or other feature to make your character more interesting and useful. But this is optional; you may opt to have no class. You may also create your own custom class, with your Game Master’s approval.

Race

This is your race or species.

You may choose a race from the database. Races also provide a unique bonus, rule, or other feature to your character. This is not optional; you must choose a race. However, you may also create your own custom race, with your Game Master’s approval.

Special

This is optional and may be left blank. You may want to select a special feature for your character. These are unique rules, origins, motivations, curses/blessings, and other things that make your character and gameplay much more interesting. They often (but not always) provide either a benefit, cost, or both. You can even get your Game Master’s approval for your own custom special feature.

Age

This can be anything you want. It only applies to role-playing and storytelling. It does not affect any of your stats.

Sex

You can be male, female, neither, both, or any other sex/gender you want. Like your age, this only applies to role-playing and storytelling. It does not affect any of your stats.

Height

How tall are you? Again, this is for storytelling and roleplaying; it doesn’t affect anything else.

Weight

How much do you weight? This one’s more important. Why? Because some powers need to know this. For example, if someone wants to levitate you (or if you want to be able to fly yourself), your power needs to be able to handle your weight. Your character’s weight should be realistic and believable for your age, sex, height, and species. If you’re a 6-inch tall fairy, you probably don’t weight 1,000 lbs. If you’re a 10-foot tall ogre, you probably weigh more than 100 lbs.

Strength

This is your character’s natural strength (without using any powers or equipment). You’ll notice that as you increase your Attack and/or Physical stats, your natural strength will also increase. But if you want super strength, you’ll get more leverage from a super power.

Your strength is automatically calculated for you.

Speed

This is your character’s natural speed (without using any powers or equipment). This is how many spaces you can move in a single turn. You’ll notice that as you increase your Defense and/or Physical stats, your natural speed will also gradually increase. But if you want super speed, you’ll get more leverage from a super power.

Your speed is automatically calculated for you.

Actions/Turn

This is how many actions you can do in a single turn. For most characters, this will always be 1. But if your character needs to be able to do multiple actions per turn (perhaps they’re a speedster, powerful alien, or super android), you’ll need to invest a lot of points into Initiative and/or Spiritual.

Your actions per turn is automatically calculated for you.

Inventory Size

This is how much space you have available to carry random items. This does not apply to powers or equipment. Items could include consumable potions, flashlights, maps, laptop computers, books, magic crystals, or other things you buy and/or find along your adventure.

Your inventory limit is automatically calculated for you. Increase your Aim, Evade, and/or any of your Attributes to increase your inventory size.

 

Level & Experience

Level

This is your current level. It’s a general indicator of how experienced and powerful you are overall.

It is automatically calculated for you, based on the amount of Lifetime Experience points you’ve earned.

Your level is important. Every time you gain a level, you gain additional Character points to improve your any of your stats any way you like.

Experience Modifier

Most characters will always receive 100% of the experience points they earn. However, some classes, races, or special rules may change this ratio for an individual. Your character might gain experience faster or slower than others. For example, suppose everyone in your party received 100 experience points each. If your Experience Modifier was 125%, you would receive 125 experience points instead of only 100. Likewise, if your Experience Modifier was 75%, you would only receive 75 experience points instead of 100.

Lifetime Experience

Any time you complete an objective or quest, defeat an opponent, or do something noteworthy, the Game Master will award you experience points. Add them to your total here. Once you have enough total Lifetime Experience points, you will automatically level up.

Next Level At

This shows you the amount of total Experience Points you need to achieve the next Level.

Available Character Points

This shows you how many free points you have available. Invest these in your stats however you like. Your Character Points are shared between your Basic, Combat, and Attributes stats.

You cannot spend more points than you currently have available. You will slowly gain free Character Points as you earn Experience throughout the game, plus extra bonus free Character Points every time you level up.

 

Cash & Fame

Cash

This is how much money you have. You can use money for whatever you want: buying weapons and armors, gambling, bribing people, paying for exotic trips and adventures, or anything else.

When you earn, find, or otherwise receive money, add it to your total here. When you spend it, deduct it from your total.

Your chosen class determines how much cash you start the game with. The Game Master can override that value with anything else.

Fame

The general public (and individual NPCs) are always forming an opinion about you, deciding whether you’re good or evil based on your actions in public.

So whenever you complete a quest, save or kill an NPC, battle while in public, or do anything else that other people can know about and witness, you will begin to accumulate Fame.

When the public perceives your actions as good, you’ll gain Fame points. When the public perceives your actions as evil, you’ll lose Fame points.

As you start to accumulate large amounts of Fame (either positive or negative), you’ll begin to have a reputation as either a hero or villain. With enough positive or negative Fame, you’ll eventually become a “super” hero or villain — or even an “arch” or “legendary” hero or villain.

Your reputation usually precedes you. NPCs will react differently when they see you coming. If you have a lot of positive Fame (hero), the public will love you and trust you and seek your help. You may gain additional bonus side quests not available to less-famous heroes. If you have a lot of negative Fame (villain), the public will fear you and run away in terror for their lives. But you may also gain different bonus side quests too, available only to the truly worthy and dastardly villains of your reputation.

This is all controlled by the Game Master. Smaller amounts of Fame may be limited to a particular city or region. But with enough Fame, you may discover you’re a celebrity no matter where you go. And of course, there’s both pros and cons to having a well-recognized face.

Tip: You only acquire Fame if other people become aware of what you did. If your actions are always in secret, or if you never leave any witnesses, you’ll keep your Fame score low.

Tip: It doesn’t matter what your intentions were, this is all about public perception. In fact, if someone else is masquerading around as you doing all kinds of evil deeds, you get the negative Fame, not them.

Tip: If you get seen doing some good things and some bad things, your Fame will end up hovering around zero, plus or minus. That’s generally neutral, and the public’s not quite sure what they think of you yet.

Most characters begin the game with no Fame. However, certain classes or races may give you starting Fame. The Game Master may also give you Fame.

 

Basic Stats

These stats are the foundation of your character.

Health

This is your health. This is your most important stat. Your total Health needs to be at least 1 at all times. If it ever drops to 0 or lower, you are dead.

By default, you start with 1 Health. You are strongly encouraged to add more points here, to increase your total Health. As a general guideline, you’ll probably want to have at least 10 Health per level, if not more.

Power

This is how much innate power you have, for creating and upgrading your own custom super powers and special abilities.

The more points you have here, the greater, stronger, and more powerful your super powers and special abilities can be. If you’re trying to create or upgrade one of your powers and don’t have quite enough Power Points (see “Creating a Super Power“), add more Character Points here.

This is probably your second most important stat. You’ll also want to invest a lot of your Character Points here too.

 

Combat Stats

Use these stats during battle. They only apply when attacking, defending, or otherwise fighting.

Initiative

This determines turn order in battle.

At the start of combat, all players and opponents will “roll for initiative.” Roll a d20 and add your total Initiative to it. The character with the highest value goes first, followed by the next highest character, and so on.

If it’s important for you to attack first, make sure you invest some points here. If you don’t care about possibly going last, save your points for something else.

Attack

When attacking with a power, weapon or other object, add to this to your total damage. It’s an added bonus for your skill and proficiency attacking with that power or weapon. If you are attacking with your bare hands (no powers, weapons, or objects), your damage is half of your total Attack value.

Defense

When defending with a power, armor, or other object, add this to your total damage reduction. It’s an added bonus for your skill and proficiency defending with that power or armor. If you are defending with no power, armor, or object of any kind, you may only use half your total Defense value.

Damage is calculated like this: Total Attack Damage – Total Defense = Damage Received.

So for example, if an attacker’s total attack (power’s damage + Attack bonus) is 10, and your total defense (armor’s damage reduction + Defense bonus) is 6, you will only receive 4 damage.

Aim

This determines if you actually hit your intended target. Whenever you attack, you compare your Aim with the defender’s Evade. If your Aim is greater than or equal to their Evade, you successful hit them.

You only calculate attack damage upon successful hits.

If you roll a Critical Hit when attacking, the defender cannot evade your attack no matter what.

Evade

This determines how good you are at dodge, evading, and avoiding incoming attacks. Whenever you’re being attacked, compare your Evade against their Aim. If your Evade is higher than their Aim, you successfully escaped the attack.

However, if an attacker gets a Critical Hit roll when attacking you, you cannot evade that attack. But if your Evade is higher than their Aim, the Critical Hit multiplier is negated and you’ll only receive normal, non-critical damage.

Overpower

Sometimes heroes and villains can summon incredible power when needed. Once this stat is enabled, you have the option to attempt to super-charge your next super power action.

Roll a d20. If your roll result is within the specified Overpower range, you triple all values of your chosen super power this action.

You may attempt to Overpower as many times as you like. However, you may only successfully do it once per battle.

By default, this stat is disabled. You need to invest at least 1 Character Point to activate this feature. If you invest multiple points, you increase the d20 range needed to succeed, making it easier and more likely to do.

If you also successfully rolled a Critical Hit on the same attack, the Critical Hit damage multiplier stacks with the Overpower multiplier, for a devastatingly powerful attack.

Resurrection

When a hero or villain dies, it’s not always the end. Sometimes, if they’re lucky, they may make a sudden and miraculous recovery. Once this stat is enabled, you have the ability to potentially return from death.

Roll a d20. If your roll result is within the specified Resurrection range, you will instantly gain Health and be able to begin taking actions again on your next turn.

The act of Resurrection counts as one whole turn. You may attempt to resurrect once per turn, as many turns as you like. However, you may only successfully resurrect once per battle.

If you successfully resurrect, you must then roll a d4 to discover how much Health you regain. If you roll 1, you instantly gain 25% of your total Health. If you roll 2, you instantly gain 50% of your total Health. If you roll 3, you instantly gain 75% of your total Health. If you roll 4, you instantly gain 100% of your total Health.

By default, this stat is disabled. You need to invest at least 1 Character Point to activate this feature. If you invest multiple points, you increase the d20 range needed to succeed, making it easier and more likely to do.

Critical Hit

If enabled, you have the option to roll a d20 before you attack. If your roll result is within the specified range, your total attack damage is doubled.

If you do not successfully Critical Hit, then your attack proceeds as a normal attack. If you successfully Critical Hit and successfully perform Overpower on the same attack, your total attack damage is doubled and then tripled, for a devastatingly powerful attack.

By default, this stat is disabled. You need to invest at least 1 Character Point to activate this feature. If you invest multiple points, you increase the d20 range needed to succeed, making it easier and more likely to do.

In rare cases, the range to Critical Hit may overlap the range to Critical Fail. In such an event, and if the d20 roll result lands within that overlapping range, you experience a Double-Critical. A Double-Critical doubles its total attack damage and hits the intended target (like a Critical Hit), but it also simultaneously damages yourself (like a Critical Fail) by the same total attack damage at the same time.

Critical Fail

If enabled, you must always roll a d20 every time before you attack. If your roll result is within the specified range, you do zero damage to your intended target and receive half of your total attack damage to yourself.

If you do not Critical Fail, your attack proceeds like a normal attack. If you Critical Fail and simultaneously performed Overpower on the same attack, you still only receive half total damage to yourself, but you also deal the same amount of damage to everyone — allies, enemies, and otherwise — adjacent to you. The Game Master decides how close someone has to be to you in order to be considered “adjacent,” based on the type of power or attack used and other factors.

By default, this stat is disabled. Why would you want to invest Character Points here? Because each point you add to the Critical Fail stat provides a free bonus Character Point you can apply anywhere else.

Investing in Critical Fail does not deduct from your total available Character Points. It adds to them.

In rare cases, the range to Critical Fail may overlap the range to Critical Hit. In such an event, and if the d20 roll result lands within that overlapping range, you experience a Double-Critical. A Double-Critical doubles its total attack damage and hits the intended target (like a Critical Hit), but it also simultaneously damages yourself (like a Critical Fail) by the same total attack damage at the same time.

 

Attributes

Use these stats for various role-playing and non-combat situations. They are commonly used for skill checks, but also interact with powers, the environment, NPCs, and potentially anything else. They are broad, umbrella categories that can apply to a wide variety of things, within their specific area.

The Game Master will always determine which Attribute(s) are applicable to a given situation or challenge. However, if you feel a different Attribute is more relevant or appropriate, you’re always welcome to plead your case to the Game Master and possibly change their mind.

For most checks, your individual Attribute total(s) are usually added as a bonus to a d20 roll, unless the Game Master says otherwise. The Game Master will determine the difficulty level, and set a minimum value needed for you to succeed. If your d20 roll plus your Attribute total meets or exceeds the Game Master’s difficulty, you succeed.

Physical

This stat relates to all things involving your physical body, such as: strength, speed, endurance, stamina, attractiveness, health, disease resistance, balance, etc.

Mental

This stat relates to all things involving your mind, such as: knowledge, expertise, problem-solving, perception, use of technology, ability to drive vehicles, memories, etc.

Spiritual

This stat relates to all things involving your soul or spirit, such as: the ability to sense or use magic, intuition, luck, divine favor, communicate with spirits, ESP, etc.

Emotional

This stat relates to all things involving your emotions and heart, such as: courage, confidence, willpower, hope, love, emotional connection, etc.

Social

This stat relates to all things involving your social aptitude and communication skills, such as: reading, writing, or speaking various languages; interacting with other people, deception, influence, negotiation, etc.

Financial

This stat relates to all things involving money, such as: buying and selling items at better prices, business skill, success in gambling or investments, ability to recognize and appraise valuable items, getting investors to sponsor a mission, etc.